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Mueller
About company

For over sixty-five years, Paul Mueller Company has earned distinction for delivering outstanding equipment and unique solutions to the process industries. Mueller has the technical expertise, innovative engineering, and manufacturing resources to implement a process system specific to your needs. From modular systems to complete turnkey plants, when you think of process, think... We focus our extensive resources, process experience, and craftsmanship on solving your processing needs. Mueller is committed to meeting and exceeding our customers' expectations of value by providing quality equipment and excellent service. Paul Mueller, founder of the Company and Chairman Emeritus, guided the Company through 60+ years of continual growth and development and has succeeded in passing on the values of integrity and product quality that are an integral part of the Company's business philosophy today and for years to come.

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NASA has put men on the moon, but it couldn't stick the landing when it came to designing a logo that is as cool as its missions. Its two attempts have been nicknamed the "meatball" and the "worm," proving that failure is an option.

The Russians were NASA's chief rival during the space race, so it's ironic that it took a young Russian named Max Lapteff to design a smart, speculative rebranding of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration logo. The mark pulls off a hat trick, referencing NASA's illustrious past, nodding to its dreams of taking us to new planets, and ditching the dated features of the old logo.

NASA has put men on the moon, but it couldn't stick the landing when it came to designing a logo that is as cool as its missions. Its two attempts have been nicknamed the "meatball" and the "worm," proving that failure is an option.

The Russians were NASA's chief rival during the space race, so it's ironic that it took a young Russian named Max Lapteff to design a smart, speculative rebranding of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration logo. The mark pulls off a hat trick, referencing NASA's illustrious past, nodding to its dreams of taking us to new planets, and ditching the dated features of the old logo.