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"RONAR RUSS" Ltd.
About company

RONAR RUSS is a Russian-Dutch company with many years of work experience in various branches of agriculture in Russia and CIS countries, that specializes in high-tech equipment and raw materials from leading European manufacturers. We supply: feedmill equipment (capacity of 2-160 t/h and more); spare parts (for feed and flour-milling equipment); twin-screw extruder lines (for production of pet and fish feed); industrial piggery equipment (full range of stable equipment from insemination to fattening, microclimate, feeding and drinking, manure removal systems, slated floors); RESCUE CARE piglet support system (set of equipment, milk replacer and liquid prestarter, cleaning products); pedigree Holstein heifers and bull semen from the Netherlands; dryers for alfalfa and other agricultural plants; commercial hatching eggs of broilers and layers. Delivery to the customer’s warehouse is done on DAP or DDP terms. All the company’s employees speak foreign languages and provide customers with comprehensive informational, technical and logistical support.

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NASA has put men on the moon, but it couldn't stick the landing when it came to designing a logo that is as cool as its missions. Its two attempts have been nicknamed the "meatball" and the "worm," proving that failure is an option.

The Russians were NASA's chief rival during the space race, so it's ironic that it took a young Russian named Max Lapteff to design a smart, speculative rebranding of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration logo. The mark pulls off a hat trick, referencing NASA's illustrious past, nodding to its dreams of taking us to new planets, and ditching the dated features of the old logo.

NASA has put men on the moon, but it couldn't stick the landing when it came to designing a logo that is as cool as its missions. Its two attempts have been nicknamed the "meatball" and the "worm," proving that failure is an option.

The Russians were NASA's chief rival during the space race, so it's ironic that it took a young Russian named Max Lapteff to design a smart, speculative rebranding of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration logo. The mark pulls off a hat trick, referencing NASA's illustrious past, nodding to its dreams of taking us to new planets, and ditching the dated features of the old logo.