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GD Animal Health
About company

The principal goal of GD Animal Health is “Teaming up for animal health, in the interest of animals, their owners and society at large”. Good health is in the interest of animals and contributes to sustainable farming. This work fulfils the wishes of a society that wants eco-friendly food that is tasty, safe and healthy. GD Animal Health has been working on these goals for almost a hundred years. GD Animal Health in Deventer is an innovative company, active in the Dutch and international markets, with an annual turnover of around 50 million euros. Along with animal owners, veterinary practices, governments and businesses, around 400 employees work daily on the health of livestock and companion animals. The heart of our company is formed by one of the largest veterinary laboratories in the world. In addition, GD Animal Health has a team of veterinarians, specialists and scientists to perform monitoring, applied research and development programmes for disease prevention and control.

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NASA has put men on the moon, but it couldn't stick the landing when it came to designing a logo that is as cool as its missions. Its two attempts have been nicknamed the "meatball" and the "worm," proving that failure is an option.

The Russians were NASA's chief rival during the space race, so it's ironic that it took a young Russian named Max Lapteff to design a smart, speculative rebranding of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration logo. The mark pulls off a hat trick, referencing NASA's illustrious past, nodding to its dreams of taking us to new planets, and ditching the dated features of the old logo.

NASA has put men on the moon, but it couldn't stick the landing when it came to designing a logo that is as cool as its missions. Its two attempts have been nicknamed the "meatball" and the "worm," proving that failure is an option.

The Russians were NASA's chief rival during the space race, so it's ironic that it took a young Russian named Max Lapteff to design a smart, speculative rebranding of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration logo. The mark pulls off a hat trick, referencing NASA's illustrious past, nodding to its dreams of taking us to new planets, and ditching the dated features of the old logo.